con·nec·tion

kəˈnekSH(ə)n/

noun

noun: connection; plural noun: connections; noun: connexion; plural noun: connexions

  1. a relationship in which a person, thing, or idea is linked or associated with something else.

    "the connections between social attitudes and productivity"


This recording represents connections - those between musical styles, people, ideas, digital and analogue waves - this recording embodies the multitude of connections that surround and link us.

Recorded and mixed at The Sound Solution, Aug-Nov 2015
Arranged, Performed and Produced by Jason Whelan
Vocal Production and additional recording Billy Sutton
Mix Advisors: Scott Hammond, Justin Merdsoy, Spencer Crewe, Billy Sutton. Mastered by Noah Mintz at The Lacquer Channel

Graphic Design: Matthew Byrne
Photography: Chris LeDrew

Jason Whelan: Vocals, Acoustic and Electric Guitars, Bouzouki, Mandola, Mandolin, Bass, Drums, Percussion, Keyboards

Thanks to Natasha Hudson, A & O and special thanks to JMZ.


1. Rocks of Ireland’s Eye  (Hammond, O’Brien, Richards)

An account of the largest drug bust in Eastern Canada at the time, in 1987.

Aaron Collis: accordion
Michael Walsh: whistle
Emilia Bartellas & Doug Dorward: fiddle
Backing vocals: Colleen Power, Jamie Dart, Bob Hallet, Brian Feltham, Darrell Power

2. The Hills of Greenmore  (Trad, arr. Whelan)

Also known in other variants as the Greenmore Hare, I prefer the meandering air and lilt of this amalgamation of two versions. Not so good for the poor hare.

Chris Ledrew: pedal steel
Paul Kinsman: organ & synth
Michael Walsh: low whistle.

3. Singles to Soukous  (Jason Whelan)

Singles are NL’s version of polkas. These are called The Kenmare Golf Disaster and Trip to Cape Spear. Somehow they got connected with African backing. 

Aaron Collis: accordion
Michael Walsh: whistle
Emilia Bartellas & Doug Dorward: fiddle.

4. Don’t Come Again  (Trad, arr. Whelan)

A warning about playing a little too hard to get, I got it from Paul Brady. Well, his record at least.

Fergus Brown O’Byrne: concertina
Michael Walsh: whistle, low whistle
Billy Sutton: fiddle.
Brian Feltham: mandola

5. There is a Call  (Jason Whelan)

A song that will probably have different meanings to different listeners. For me, it represents various life events and phases.

Michael Walsh: low whistle.

6. Jigs  (Jason Whelan)

A set of my jigs – The first, A Hand of Growl (a local card game, a.k.a ‘120s’), and a jig dedicated to Aly O’Brien, a famed local farmer, teacher and music lover.

Aaron Collis: accordion
Paddy Mackey: bodhran
Michael Walsh: whistle
Emilia Bartellas & Doug Dorward: fiddle
Jack Daw: upright bass

7. Company Man  (Jason Whelan)

Some people give their lives to an organization, and many regret it. The movie About Schmidt comes to mind. 

Billy Sutton: fiddle.

8. Betsy’s Rooster  (Trad, arr. Whelan)

A song from Petit Forte, Placentia Bay about cock robbery. I got the words from my grandfather, PJ Wakeham, from his New Land Magazine, and added a few more, along with the air Kitty Jones to make the song. The hornpipe is called Walsh’s, but is not referring to anyone named Walsh specifically.

Michael Walsh: whistle
Fergus Brown O’Byrne: concertina
Paddy Mackey: bodhran
Jack Daw: upright bass
Billy Sutton: fiddle, bodhran.

9. Skeleton in the Closet  (Jason Whelan)

Sometimes people think they have pulled the wool over your eyes or gotten away with something, but…. 

Michael Walsh: whistle
Aaron Collis: accordion
Billy Sutton: fiddle.

10. Captain Kidd Retold  (Jason Whelan)

Captain William Kidd got a bad rap so I rewrote the song and changed the air to Ye Jacobites by Name, a more ominous melody for the song I felt. For more info check out The Pirate Hunter by Richard Zacks, a great book about Kidd’s misfortunes.

Fergus Brown O’Byrne: concertina
Paul Kinsman: organ, piano.

11. Once Around the Harbour  (Denis Parker)

A song with great imagery. Frigates, cannon and boarding bells abound.

Paul Kinsman: organ & piano
Chris LeDrew: pedal steel
Denis Parker: vocals & harmonica
Backing vocals: Jamie Dart, Colleen Power, Ward Pike